A Beaujolais (Blanc) for #ChardonnayDay

I enjoy celebrating the various “wine” days. #ChampagneDay is my favorite, but in the last few years, I’ve come to enjoy Chardonnay and #ChardonnayDay very much

I’ve not always been a fan of Chardonnay. In fact I was on the verge of being an “ABC”er (Anything But Chardonnay).

The I went to a Pure Chablis tasting a couple of years ago that changed my relationship with Chardonnay forever

Chardonnay is a great grape that produces such a diverse style of wines. I guess I just had to find my style….

Being the promiscuous wine lover I am, I was looking for something new, and different.

First stop – my favorite wine store K&L Wine Merchants. There I came across the 2013 Jean-Paul Brun “Terres Dorees” Chardonnay Beaujolais Blanc.

 I’d never heard of it before!

Here some info from wine searcher.com…

Beaujolais Blanc is, perhaps not surprisingly, a term reserved for white wines grown in Beaujolais from the Chardonnay grape variety. A part of the wider Beaujolais appellation (which also covers red and rosé wines), Beaujolais Blanc makes up just a tiny portion of the region’s production. White wines from Beaujolais are light and fresh, with characteristic aromas of stone fruit, pears, and melon.

While large swathes of Beaujolais are planted to Gamay (that variety being most suited to the granitic terroir of the region), plantings of Chardonnay fare well in the limestone soils in northern Beaujolais. Here, the rolling hills are essentially a continuation of the southern Maconnais, and the wine styles produced in both areas are very similar. In fact, the vineyard areas of the Macon appellation overlap those of Beaujolais Blanc, and many white wines made in northern Beaujolais are sold under the better-known Macon appellation

Here what K&L’s wine buyer says about his particular producer and wine:

Jean Paul Brun is located in Charnay, a village in the Southern Beaujolais just north of Lyons, in a beautiful area known as the “Region of Golden Stones.” Brun is the owner and winemaker at this 40-acre family estate and has attracted the attention of the French and American press for the wonderfully fruity and delicate wines he produces.

In the far southern end of Beaujolais that magical limestone resurfaces. He was able to acquire some 80 year old Chardonnay vines on just this soil. he makes the wine in stainless steel, with no oak influence. The result is an interesting Chardonnay of great richness, with pear and citrus notes. It finishes with bright and refreshing acidity and a rich buttery note. A charming wine for a song.

Here are my tasting notes:

Shows green apple, peach, under ripe melon white flower and lime zest aromas. Palate follows with the addition of an appealing chalky minerality. Round with very good concentration. Raised in SS and concrete. Drinks quite a bit over its $16 price! 

This is indeed a charming wine! I’m looking forward to pairing it with some fish, shellfish, or maybe some sushi!

Will buy more!

Happy #ChardonnayDay!

Wines At Our Table; May 17th, 2015

Over the course of a week, my wife and I drink a bunch o’wine – almost always with food. Since I’ve always been fascinated by wine at the table with food, I thought it would be fun to recap not only the wines we’ve been drinking, but also how they pair (or don’t pair) with the foods at our table.  It features my pick for Wine of the Week a  wine I particularly enjoy, whether it’s something new and different, is a great value, or from a producer worth checking out; for the week ended May 17th, 2015.

2013 Château La Canorgue Luberon Rosé - Retail – $20
Pink orange color with promising red fruit, lavender, anise and a bit of mineral aromas. On the palate it’s medium-bodied and fresh with tart cherry, red currant, and spice flavors and a lingering tangy mineral driven finish. 50/50 Blend of Grenache/Syrah Very good; 86-88 pts

Scharffenberger Brut Excellence - Retail – $16
Pale gold color with appealing brioche, soft red fruits, pear, citrus and a kiss of spice aromas. On the palate, it’s medium-bodied with a creamy mousse, and a soft harmonious character. It shows pear, strawberry , mandarin orange, just a bit of plum and cinnamon flavors with a clean satisfying finish. Very good; 86-88 pts

2013 Casa D’Ambra Biancolella Ischia Frassitelli - Retail – $28
Pale golden color with restrained honey, yellow apple, sea breeze and wet stone aromas. On the palate, it’s light-bodied, and focused with a wonderful texture and good acidity with apricot, yellow apple, honey, and a bit of almond flavors with a mineral driven lingering finish. Very good; 86-88 pts

2008 Bisceglia Aglianico del Vulture Gudarrà - Retail – $20
Very dark crimson color with a black fruits, tar, dark chocolate, and glimpses of truffle and violet aromas. On the palate, it’s medium-bodied with astringent tannins and black currant, black cherry, plum and bittersweet chocolate flavors. Long finish. Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

Wine of the Week

It was a week of “firsts” for me.  I tried a couple of Italian wines from Campania region for the first time.  One made from Biancolella, a new to me, grape that is usually blended with Forestera for Ischia Bianco.   But my bottle was 100% Biancolella. The other was a  red made from ,arguably, southern Italy’s most important variety Aglianico, (specifically Aglianico del Vulture – a region known as It is one of southern Italy’s greatest wines and has been dubbed the ‘Barolo of the South’)  I enjoyed both, though, I would have enjoyed the Aglianico more had it not been as tannic as it was.

It was also my first time trying a Rose from Luberon region of the France.  Also quite enjoyable.

In fact, I enjoyed all the wines pretty much equally.  In such a situation, I ask myself “Which wine would you buy again?” 

This week, the answer, and my Wine of the Week is the Scharffenberger Brut Excellence.

From the winery…

The history of Scharffenberger Cellars begins in 1981 in the heart of California’s Anderson Valley. Situated only miles from the coastal influences of the Pacific Ocean, Scharffenberger Cellars also enjoys the deep soils and sunshine within the protected valley. Originally founded by John Scharffenberger, the company has gone through many transitions, including a name change when it was formally known as Pacific Echo from 1998 until July 2004. Today, the name has been restored back to Scharffenberger Cellars under the new management of Maisons Marques & Domaines (Champagne Louis Roederer, and Roederer Estate among others).

With the many changes at Scharffenberger Cellars, what has remained consistent is the quality and the original philosophy behind the winemaking. Tex Sawyer, winemaker since 1989 continues to manage the winemaking program and today works with the new ownership to restore the glory of the original brand name.

The Brut Excellence is made from Schraffenberger’s own 120-acre vineyards in the Anderson Valley. In addition, Scharffenberger Cellars has long-term contracts with select vineyards in the greater Mendocino County

The Scharffenberger Brut is blended with two-thirds Pinot Noir and one-third Chardonnay. All the fruit for Scharffenberger Brut undergoes 100% malolactic fermentation.  It is aged two years on lees. 1% RS. 12% alcohol.

IMG_2492

It would be interesting to taste this wine blind back to back with its Anderson Valley stable mate the Roederer Estate Brut.  The primary difference between the two are that the Schraffenberger undergoes malolactic fermentation, while the Roederer Estate Brut doesn’t.  The Roederer has slightly higher RS at 1.2% and retails for $4 more.  

We paired this wine with fried chicken, as well a pulled pork sandwich. If you haven’t tried sparkling wine and fried chicken together…you’re missing a treat. That make the Scharffenberg and Fried Chicken my Food and Wine Pairing of the Week!

What was your Wine of the Week?  Any killer Food and Wine pairings?

Follow my wine reviews on Vivino and Delectable

Note. All wines were purchased for review unless otherwise indicated
_________________________________________________________________

Martin Redmond is a Financial Executive by day, and a certified wine geek with latent foodie tendencies the rest of the time. In addition to the wine lifestyle and food he enjoys family, fitness and traveling. He likes to get thoughts of wine off his mind by sharing experiences on his ENOFYLZ Wine blog, which features wine reviews, wine country travel, and wine and food pairings.

Follow me on Twitter @martindredmond for all things wine, and since I’m a wino, with latent foodie tendencies, you’ll also find food and wine pairings, and food related stuff! Become a fan and join ENOFYLZ Wine Blog on Facebook. Cheers! This article is original to ENOFYLZ Wine Blog.com. Copyright 2015 ENOFYLZ Wine BlogAll rights reserved.

#WineWednesday Review: A Taste of Robert Mondavi Napa Valley

From time to time, I receive wines samples for review from wineries or their public relations agencies.  I feature such samples on here on #WineWednesday Review. This week I’m featuring (a.k.a. catching up on samples;-) trio of current releases from  Robert Mondavi Winery collection of Napa Valley wines.  

The Winery

The Robert Mondavi Winery was established in 1966 by Robert Mondavi, one of the most influential and esteemed winemakers in California history (Click here for his story).  It was the first major winery built in Napa Valley. For decades it was California’s most famous winery.  It was acquired by Constellation Brands in 2004.

It’s a beautiful property with classic California mission-style architecture, with an expansive archway and bell tower.  I must confess I haven’t been in a long time.  I recall visiting on one of my first trips to Napa.  Nowadays, I tend to visit the smaller wineries.  But, I’ve been impressed with their reserve wines.  I’ve also been impressed with a few of their entry-level wines  In particular the Napa Valley Merlot, and the Private Selection Meritage provide very good to great price quality performance.

The wines

Robert Mondavi’s original vision was to produce wines from the Napa Valley that would stand in the company of the world’s finest. These wines are sourced from the finest appellations in the Napa Valley including Oakville, Stag’s Leap, Carneros and other select vineyard sites. The wines are blended together to create wines of complexity and elegance made possible by the diversity of these vineyard sites.

2013 Robert Mondavi Winery Fumé Blanc

The Original Fumé Blanc. Robert Mondavi created the term in 1966 to distinguish his dry Sauvignon Blanc from the sweeter-styled Sauvignon Blanc wines made at the time. It’s a blend of 90% Sauvignon Blanc & 10% Semillon. Napa Valley – 89% (61% Wappo Hill Vineyard, 20% To Kalon Vineyard) and Mendocino County – 11%.  14.5% alcohol; Retail – $20

Sixty percent of the juice was barrel fermented for added richness and complexity, with eight percent in new French oak. The balance underwent a cool fermentation in stainless steel to heighten the vibrant fruity and herbal flavors. The new wine was aged for five months in 60-gallon French oak barrels, sûr lie (on the yeast lees) and hand stirred twice a month for a creamy texture and seamless integration of flavors. The addition of 10% Semillon gives the final blend a broader mouth feel and enhanced complexity.

IMG_2447

My tasting notes follow:

Pale yellow with a green hued color with grapefruit, white flower, and low-key grassy aromas. On the palate, it’s light-bodied, fresh and nicely balanced with grapefruit, key lime, and a kiss of herbal flavors. Lengthy finish.  This is my kind of Sauvignon Blanc! Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

Pair with: Mussels in White Wine.  We did, and it was a fabulous pairing!

2012 Robert Mondavi Winery Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley

The wine is a blend of 88% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Cabernet Franc, 4% Merlot, 1% Petit Verdot, & 1% Malbec  14.5 alcohol. Retail – $28 

The new wine was drained and gently pressed into 15% new French oak barrels for malolactic fermentation, assuring seamless integration of fruit and oak. The final blend was assembled through repeated tasting trials over the 16 months of barrel aging, and bottled in June of 2014

IMG_2450

My tasting notes follow:

Dark ruby color with aromatic, blackberry, black currant, a bit of tobacco, eucalyptus and violet aromas. On the palate it’s medium-bodied, and well made with an appealing texture, dusty tannins, and good acidity with blackberry, black currant, black cherry, and a hint of dark chocolate flavors. Lingering sweet finish.  Approachable now, it should age well in the short-term (2-5 years)   Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

Pair with: Short Ribs Bourguignon or your favorite burgers!

2013 Robert Mondavi Winery Pinot Noir

Sourced from the Napa Valley side of the Carneros growing area

IMG_1616

My tasting notes follow:

Ruby color with restrained raspberry, red plum, earth and a bit of spice aromas. On the palate it’s medium-bodied showing a nice balance of fruit, acid and tannins with raspberry, strawberry, a bit of plum, earth and pronounced spice flavors. Med finish. Very good; 86-88 pts

Pair with: Herb Crusted Pork Tenderloin or Cedar Plank Salmon

These wines are a great example of the advantages of a winery the size of Robert Mondavi – economy of scale, and breadth of their offerings. They produce wines at all price/quality levels along the wine spectrum from budget to super-premium wines.  There’s something for everyone!

I want to highlight the value these wines offer. I was especially impressed with the value both the Sauvignon Blanc and the Cabernet Sauvignon offer. Both are wines I’d highly recommend!  

Wines provided as a samples for review.  Many thanks to Folsom & Associates & Robert Mondavi Winery

Follow my wine reviews on Vivino and Delectable

__________________________________________________________________

Martin Redmond is a Financial Executive by day, and a certified wine geek with latent foodie tendencies the rest of the time. In addition to the wine lifestyle and food he enjoys family, fitness and traveling. He likes to get thoughts of wine off his mind by sharing experiences on his ENOFYLZ Wine blog, which features wine reviews, wine country travel, and wine and food pairings.

Follow me on Twitter @martindredmond for all things wine, and since I’m a wino, with latent foodie tendencies, you’ll also find food and wine pairings, and food related stuff! Become a fan and join ENOFYLZ Wine Blog on Facebook. Cheers!

This article is original to ENOFYLZ Wine Blog.com. Copyright 2015 ENOFYLZ Wine BlogAll rights reserved.

Wines At Our Table; May 10th, 2015

Over the course of a week, my wife and I drink a bunch o’wine – almost always with food. Since I’ve always been fascinated by wine at the table with food, I thought it would be fun to recap not only the wines we’ve been drinking, but also how they pair (or don’t pair) with the foods at our table.  It features my pick for Wine of the Week a  wine I particularly enjoy, whether it’s something new and different, is a great value, or from a producer worth checking out; for the week ended May 10th, 2015.

2010 JC Cellars Grenache The Fallen Angel El Diablo - Retail – $42

Opaque violet color with appealing kirsch, blackberry, Herbs de Provence, and white pepper aromas. On the palate, medium-bodied, with good acidity and fine-grained well-integrated tannins with baked black cherry, blackberry, black raspberry and espresso flavors, and a bit of minerality, and a lingering finish. Russian River fruit. 50/50 Grenache and Syrah. Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

2013 Campovida Viognier Estate Grown - Retail – $38

Pale golden-yellow color with appealing white peach, apricot, honey, and a hint of floral aromas. On the palate it’s medium-bodied, fresh, and persistent with focused peach, melon, apricot, and honey flavors. Lingering finish Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

2008 Big Basin Vineyards Syrah Fairview Ranch - Retail – $48 

Opaque violet color with appealing roasted meat, roasted black fruit, smoke and a hint of truffle aromas. On the palate it’s medium bodied with very good acidity and soft well-integrated tannins and a hint of minerality with concentrated roast boysenberry, plum, blueberry and hickory flavors. Long finish. Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

2003 Roederer Estate L’Ermitage Brut - Retail $48

Pale straw yellow color with abundant tiny bubbles with bread crust, baked apple, and hazelnut aromas. On the palate, it shows a delicate creamy mousse with mineral accented baked apple and pear, toasted hazelnut, apricot and a hint of spiced vanilla flavors. Long finish. 12.1% alcohol –  Outstanding; 92-95 pts

Wine of the Week 

The Campovida Viognier is one of our favorite Viognier.  Campovida is interesting because it’s a family owned and operated certified organic farm and working vineyard. With a retreat center. I had, what I think was, the last of my 2008 vintage wines that was smoke-tainted by the wild fires in California that year, Big Basin did a good job of making lemonade out of lemons, and I found the smokiness to be appealing.  

My Wine of the Week is the 2003 Roederer Estate L’Ermitage Brut.

Roederer Estate is the American outpost of Champagne Louis Roederer.  Their Estate Brut is my favorite under $20 (when on sale) multi-vintage California sparkling wine. We picked up this wine during our last visit to their beautiful winery a couple of years ago.

Their 580-acre family owned estate vineyard and winery are located in the Anderson Valley.  It’s a blend of  52% Chardonnay, 48% Pinot Noir with 4% aged reserve wine (vintage ’99). It was aged 5.5 years in French oak cask + at least 6 month in bottle prior to release.  It’s an outstanding vintage bottle of California sparkling wine that a relative bargain too! The latest release can be found for $39.99 at K&L Wine merchants.

I had the pleasure of meeting Chef de Caves and  Executive Vice-President in charge of the production Jean-Baptiste Lecaillon while visiting Champagne Louis Roederer last fall. He told us that he checks in on Roederer Estate a couple of time a year.

IMG_1187

The Roederer winemaking philosophy has guided the development of Roederer Estate, located 125 miles north of San Francisco near the Mendocino Coast. Since 1982, Roederer Estate winery has been quietly developing its own vineyards and crafting fine wines from the Anderson Valley. Roederer Estate’s Anderson Valley Brut debuted in October 1988 followed by the winery’s first vintage cuvée,L’Ermitage, in 1989, released in the fall of 1993.

Logo2HighRes_9

L’Ermitage, Roederer Estate’s special Tête de Cuvée, is a sparkling wine made only in exceptional years from pre-selected, estate-grown grapes. Carrying on the tradition of Champagne Louis Roederer in France, Roederer Estate produces its sparkling wines in the traditional French methode and adds special oak-aged reserve wines to each blend. 

What was your Wine of the Week?  Any killer Food and Wine pairings?

Follow my reviews on Vivino and Delectable

Note. All wines were purchased for review unless otherwise indicated
_________________________________________________________________

Martin Redmond is a Financial Executive by day, and a certified wine geek with latent foodie tendencies the rest of the time. In addition to the wine lifestyle and food he enjoys family, fitness and traveling. He likes to get thoughts of wine off his mind by sharing experiences on his ENOFYLZ Wine blog, which features wine reviews, wine country travel, and wine and food pairings.

Follow me on Twitter @martindredmond for all things wine, and since I’m a wino, with latent foodie tendencies, you’ll also find food and wine pairings, and food related stuff! Become a fan and join ENOFYLZ Wine Blog on Facebook. Cheers! This article is original to ENOFYLZ Wine Blog.com. Copyright 2015 ENOFYLZ Wine BlogAll rights reserved.

Chicken Pipián Verde, Mexican Quinoa and the Devil’s Collection White #winePW

Wine Pairing Weekend is a monthly collaborative event for wine/food bloggers started by David Crowley of Cooking Chat.  It’s a great way to find food and wine pairings that work; along with tips on how to create your own food and wine pairing magic.  Christy of Confessions of a Culinary Diva is hosting this month’s South of the Border theme featuring wine pairings for Mexican Cuisine.

On My Plate

I adore Mexican cuisine. It’s easily the ethnic food I’ve had the most.  When I considered what main dish to try for this month’s South of the Border theme, two things came to mind.

Try something new, and try something authentic.

I decided to check out the La Cocina de Leslie blog, which is written by Leslie Limón, a native Californian who has been living in Mexico for 13+ years.  Bingo!

The recipe I chose is Chicken Pipían Verde.  Here’s how Leslie describes it…

“..Pipián is a traditional Mexican sauce that gets its distinct grainy texture from the pepitas. Pipián can be made in one of two ways: Pipián Verde made with tomatillos and roasted poblano peppers and Pipián Rojo made with tomatoes and dried ancho chiles. Pipián can be served over fish, shrimp, roasted pork, or chicken. Whether you choose to make Pipián Verde or Rojo, you’ll love the nutty flavor the pepitas adds to this exquisite sauce.”  Note: I’ve also seen where it can be served over Chile Rellenos

Leslie suggested serving with Mexican Rice, but I wanted a healthier option.  I chose One Pan Mexican Quinoa from Damned Delicious

DSCN1005

I essentially stuck to the recipes with the exception of  the following:

  • For the Pipián Verde I substituted corn meal for masa harina because I couldn’t find any in time.
  • For the Mexican Quinoa, I substituted chipotle chili powder for chili powder and used can of Southwestern corn instead of corn.

Considering it was my first time ever working with tomatillas, the Pipián Verde turned out very well.  Likewise for the Mexican Quinoa!

Both were delicious.  I highly recommend both recipes!  They are delicious (and pretty healthy too!)  How delicious were they?

My wife, and I both had seconds (actually she had thirds…but you didn’t hear that from me;-).

I even made Chicken Pipián Verde again a few days later (did I mention that my wife loves it)? Except this time we grilled the chicken, tomatillas, and Serrano peppers.

Wow! We enjoyed it even more!

In My Glass

The first two wines that came to mind to pair with my Mexican food was either Riesling (It pairs well with damn near everything) or Sauvignon Blanc.

I had neither.

But I did have a sample of Concha Y Toro’s Casillero del Diablo Devils Blend White. It’s a  blend of 85% Sauvignon Blanc, 10% Chardonnay,and 5% Gewürztraminer from Chile’s Casablanca Valley.

I decided to give it a go…

DSCN1024-001

My tasting notes follow:

Very pale green color with apple, lime, peach, and hints of honeysuckle and gooseberry aromas On the palate, it’s medium bodied, and dry with refreshing acidity, and a soft pleasing texture that envelopes ample apple, lime, grapefruit and a kiss of peach flavors. Lingering finish.  Overall, this is an appealing, fresh, well-balanced balanced wine that delivers very good value for the money  Very good; 86-88 pts  Retail ~$15; 13.5% alcohol.

The Pairing

Overall, this was a very good pairing.  The predominance of Sauvignon Blanc in the blend worked well with the Pipián  Verde Sauce.  But, I think the wine worked better with the Chicken Pipián  Verde than the Mexican Quinoa because the quinoa had a pretty spicy kick to it.  So a bit more residual sugar (sweetness) would have made the wine pair better with the quinoa.

Don’t stop here!

Check out what my fellow #winePW bloggers came up with for this month’s theme! 

Join the #winePW conversation: Follow the #winePW conversation on Twitter throughout the weekend and beyond. If you’re reading this early enough, you can join us for a live Twitter chat on our theme “South of the Border” on Saturday, May 9th, from 8 a.m. to ( a.m Pacific Time. You can also visit our group Pinterest board to pin some great pairing ideas for later! Stay tuned for the June  Wine Pairing Weekend, which will be on Saturday, June 13, 2015

#WineWednesday Review: Casillero del Diablo Devil’s Collection

From time to time, I receive wines samples from wineries or their public relations agencies for review.  I feature such samples on here on #WineWednesday Review. This week I’m featuring two blends from the Casillero del Diablo Devil’s Collection.

The Winery

Casillero del Diablo is one of the many brands of Concha Y Toro, the largest producer of wines from Latin America and is one of the global leaders in wine production.

Legend has it that Don Melchor de Santiago Concha y Toro, who founded Concha Y Toro in 1883, created the wine legend of  ”Casillero del Diablo” (which translates to the “Devil’s cellar”) when he spread rumors that the devil lived in the cellar to keep strangers away from his private reserve.

Casillero del Diablo is one of the most popular brands in its native Chile, and the most renown Chilean wine brand in the world. It is sold in 135 countries and they sell around three million cases a year.

The Wines

I received two wines:

  • 2013 Concha y Toro Casillero del Diablo Reserva Devil’s Collection White 
  • 2013 Concha y Toro Casillero del Diablo Reserva Devil’s Collection Red 

The wines are the latest additions to the Casillero del Diablo range

2013 Devil’s Collection White Blend

The Devil’s collection White is a blend of 85% Sauvignon Blanc, 10% Chardonnay,and 5% Gewürztraminer from Chile’s Casablanca Valley.  After fermentation, the wine was aged sur lie for at least 8 months in stainless steel. Retail ~$15; 13.5% alcohol.

IMG_2116-001

My tasting notes follow:

Very pale green color with apple, lime, peach, and hints of honeysuckle and gooseberry aromas On the palate, it’s medium bodied with refreshing acidity, and a soft pleasing texture that envelopes ample apple, lime, grapefruit and a kiss of peach flavors. Lingering finish.  Overall, this is an appealing, fresh, well-balanced balanced wine that delivers very good value for the money.   Very good; 86-88 pts

Pair with: We enjoyed it with Chicken Pipian Verde, but it would also pair well with appetizers, goat cheese, or seafood dishes.

2013 Devil’s Collection Red Blend

The Devil’s Collection Red is a blend of 60% Syrah, 25% Cabernet Sauvignon and 15% Carmenere from Chile’s Rapel Valley.  Approximately 60% of the wine was aged in a combination of French and American oak for 9 months, while the rest was aged in stainless steel.  Retail ~$15. 13.5% alcohol

IMG_2429

My tasting notes follow:

Ruby color with plum, blackberry, a bit of plum and oak aromas. On the palate, it’s medium-bodied with good acidity, a smooth texture and easy black currant, blackberry, plum, vanilla and a bit of dark chocolate flavors  Overall,  another appealing, well-balanced wine with moderate complexity that delivers very good value for the money. Very good; 86-88 pts

Pair with: Burgers, tacos, tomato-based pasta dishes, and hard cheeses

Follow my wine reviews on Vivino and Delectable

Wine provided as a sample for review.  Many thanks to Creative Palate Communications

__________________________________________________________________

Martin Redmond is a Financial Executive by day, and a certified wine geek with latent foodie tendencies the rest of the time. In addition to the wine lifestyle and food he enjoys family, fitness and traveling. He likes to get thoughts of wine off his mind by sharing experiences on his ENOFYLZ Wine blog, which features wine reviews, wine country travel, and wine and food pairings.

Follow me on Twitter @martindredmond for all things wine, and since I’m a wino, with latent foodie tendencies, you’ll also find food and wine pairings, and food related stuff! Become a fan and join ENOFYLZ Wine Blog on Facebook. Cheers!

This article is original to ENOFYLZ Wine Blog.com. Copyright 2015 ENOFYLZ Wine BlogAll rights reserved.

Wines At Our Table; Week May 3rd, 2015

Over the course of a week, my wife and I drink a bunch o’wine – almost always with food. Since I’ve always been fascinated by wine at the table with food, I thought it would be fun to recap not only the wines we’ve been drinking, but also how they pair (or don’t pair) with the foods at our table.  It features my pick for Wine of the Week a  wine I particularly enjoy, whether it’s something new and different, is a great value, or from a producer worth checking out; for the week ended May 3rd, 2015.

2010 Copain Pinot Noir Les Voisins - Retail – $42
Dark Ruby color fading toward tawny at the rim with appealing earthy, savory cardamom laced red fruits, plum, and sandalwood aromas on the palate it’s medium bodied and harmonious fruit.acidity and velvety tannins with bing cherry, plum, raspberry spice and a pleasing minerality. Lingering finish.Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

2010 Dashe Cellars Zinfandel Florence Vineyard - Retail – $32
Deep black red color with black and red fruits, lavender, violet and potpourri spice aromas. On the palate, it’s medium-bodied, elegant and fresh with well-integrated soft tannins, and black raspberry, black cherry, a bit of strawberry, cranberry flavor. Long finish. Outstanding; 92-95 pts

2011 Sartarelli Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Tralivio - Retail – $15
Intense straw yellow color with green nuances with low-key stone fruit, apple, almond skin, lees, and crushed rock aromas. On the palate it’s medium-bodied, dry, and fresh with a supple texture and peach, apple and lemon zest flavors and an appealing subtly spicy minerality on a lingering finish Very Good to Outstanding; 89-91 pts

2014 Bonny Doon Vineyard Vin Gris de Cigare - Retail – $16
Very pale salmon color with melon, peach, subtle strawberry and tea leaf aromas. On the palate, it’s medium-bodied, and fresh with a wonderful mouth-feel and peach, melon, strawberry, and spiced citrus flavors with a lingering saline finish. Blend of 35% grenache, 18% mourvèdre, 16% grenache blanc, 12.5% roussanne, 8% carignane, 8% cinsaut, 1.5% marsanne, 1% counoise. 13% alcohol Very good; 86-88 pts

Wine of the Week 

I skipped a week of this feature because we were out of time attending the 26th  Annual Passport to Dry Creek Valley.  We made a four-day weekend of it, plus I’ve been catching up on some sample wines so little had been pulled from our cellar.

All of this week’s wines were notable, each for their own reason.  I had my first Verdicchio, and it was wonderful.  Such a food friendly wine.   The Bonny Doon Vin Gris de Cigare is a perennial favorite, and in a world of roses where it more and more challenging to find very good to outstanding rose for under $20 it’s consistently just that.  The Dashe Florence Zinfandel was outstanding, and my highest rated wine. But the wine, I keep thinking about, and my Wine of the Week is the 2010 Copain Les Voisins Pinot Noir.

Copain Wines, located in Healdsburg, CA is small family owned winery founded in 1999.   Wells Guthrie is the owner/winemaker.  He discovered early on that his taste in wine gravitated toward Europe in general and France’s Rhône Valley in particular. So much so, he picked up and moved with his new bride to the region to learn from the best. For two years, Wells apprenticed for esteemed winemaker and living legend Michel Chapoutier in France’s Rhone Valley. During that time, Wells was deeply inspired by the traditions and practices of French winemaking, not to mention the European attitude that wine is an essential part of life. At Copain, he creates wines that are firmly rooted in California, yet with the sensibilities of the European wines that so moved him. He is as committed to crafting these elegant, nuanced wines as he is to building a legacy that will be passed down to his daughters in the great tradition of European winemakers whose estates have been in the same family for generation.

Copain sources fruit from a diverse vineyard (typically cool-climate ) sites from Mendocino County to Santa Barbara.

I’ve visited the winery on numerous occasions.  It’s one of my favorite wineries to visit in Sonoma County.  Sitting in the an Adirondack chair, under the shade of the trees, gazing out over the Russian River Valley and enjoying a glass of Copain wine is one of life’s simple, but oh so satisfying pleasures for me!

IMG_2112

What was your Wine of the Week?  Any killer Food and Wine pairings?

Follow my wine reviews on Vivino and Delectable

Note. All wines were purchased for review unless otherwise indicated
_________________________________________________________________

Martin Redmond is a Financial Executive by day, and a certified wine geek with latent foodie tendencies the rest of the time. In addition to the wine lifestyle and food he enjoys family, fitness and traveling. He likes to get thoughts of wine off his mind by sharing experiences on his ENOFYLZ Wine blog, which features wine reviews, wine country travel, and wine and food pairings.

Follow me on Twitter @martindredmond for all things wine, and since I’m a wino, with latent foodie tendencies, you’ll also find food and wine pairings, and food related stuff! Become a fan and join ENOFYLZ Wine Blog on Facebook. Cheers! This article is original to ENOFYLZ Wine Blog.com. Copyright 2015 ENOFYLZ Wine BlogAll rights reserved.

 

A Taste of Marche; Chicken in Potacchio with Sartarelli Verdicchio

One of the things I love most about food and wine is their ability to transport one to a different place.  And a  place’s people, culture, and customs are reflected in its food and wine.  In that sense, one can virtually travel the world through food and wine.  And that is exactly what we are doing through Italian Food Wine and Travel (#ItalianFWT).  We taking a virtual tour of Italy by exploring its food and wines.  This month we’re exploring Marche (a.k.a Le Marche)!

A Taste of Marche; Chicken in Potacchio with Sartarelli Verdicchio

Image courtesy of holidayinmarche.com

Marche (pronounced Mar-kay), is the third region, alongside Tuscany and Umbria, that makes up Central Italy. It located between the Adriatic coast and the Apennine Mountains with Emilia-Romagna to the north.

It is a lesser known and lightly traveled hidden gem rich in history with walled hilltop villages, castles, spectacular limestone caves, rolling farms, craggy hillsides, and amazing sandy beaches. If you’re looking to get off the beaten path, and away from the ravages of mass tourism, check out Le Marche!

While cuisine of Marche is lesser known than that of its neighboring regions of Tuscany and Emilia Romagna, highlights include  the appetizer olive ascolane which are crispy fried stuffed olives, ciascolo, a soft smoked pork sausage flavored with fennel and garlic, brodetto, a classic fish stew, and the epic baked pasta dish vincisgrassi that is similar to the well-known lasagna.

On my plate

Chicken in Potacchio is a traditional chicken dish from the Marche region of Italy. Potacchio is a cooking method specific to Le Marche which involves braising fish, chicken or rabbit in white wine, garlic, tomato and rosemary.

After perusing various recipes, most of which featured braising, I found this recipe and video.  It’s a bit of twist on the traditional recipe in that the chicken is roasted rather than braised.  Additionally, the addition of potatoes and onions make it  a one-pan meal. It’s my kind of recipe…

Easy.

I like easy. Especially on weeknights!

Roasted Chicken in Potacchio
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree; One Pan Meal
Cuisine: Italian
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
The key to a mess-free meal is to keep it simple, and it doesn't get much simpler than a full meal in one pan!
Ingredients
  • 1 (3½ - 4 pound) chicken (trimmed and patted dry)
  • 2 - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 medium new potatoes (quartered)
  • 6 small sprigs rosemary
  • 1 large onion (cut into 8 wedges)
  • 1 cup crushed canned tomatoes
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 375°F.
  2. Rub the chicken all over with a tablespoon or two of olive oil and season it well with salt inside and out. Add a pinch of cayenne to inside and outside of chicken. Put the chicken in a large roasting pan (you want some room around the chicken to hold the vegetables in a single layer). Add the potatoes, rosemary, onion, tomatoes, and wine to the roasting pan around the chicken. Drizzle a tablespoon or so of olive oil.
  3. Roast the chicken until done, periodically basting it with the liquid that accumulates, 1 to 1½ hours depending on the size of the bird. (When cooked through, the juices that result from pricking the thigh will run clear and a thermometer inserted in the thigh will read 170°F.) Let the bird sit for 10 minutes before carving.
  4. To serve: Serve the chicken pieces with the potatoes and onions from the pan. Spoon out some of the tomato "sauce" and add that to the plate, too.
Notes
If you watch the video, red pepper flakes are used to season the bird, but the recipe calls for cayenne pepper (which I took to mean as crushed red pepper). I seasoned the bird inside and out with the crushed cayenne, then sprinkled red pepper flakes over the bird, tomatoes, onions and potatoes before roasting.

Let the chicken come to room temperature before roasting to ensure even cooking and moistness

The chicken turned out beautifully.  Roasting the tomatoes, wine, and red pepper transformed them into a chili sauce like sauce that’s a little sweet and a little spicy. Likewise roasting the onion and potatoes carmelizes them and makes them a bit sweeter and tastier.

Whenever I roast a chicken I’m concerned the breast meat will dry out, but the even the breast meat was moist and juicy!

It’s was delicious…and easy…I’ll be making it again!

DSCN1206

In my Glass

I often use my Wine Bible by Karen MacNeil as a resource when researching wine regions.

Le Marche wasn’t in the Wine Bible.

The wine for which Marche is best known, Verdicchio wasn’t in the Wine Bible.

I checked my “Concise World Atlas of Wine” by Huge Johnson and Jancis Robinson.   The Marche didn’t do much better there. It warranted a paragraph about Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi, which, at least,  included this:

..it is the Verdicchio grape that is responsible for the most exciting white wines.

This might be because the most well-known wine from the Marche used to be wine in green bottles shaped like fish…

7-SAV138-backinstyle-400x600 (1)

But that’s the way Verdicchio used to be back in the day. It was cheap, easy, and cleverly packaged. Ultimately, it suffered the same indignity as Chianti in straw bottles.

However, the world’s diminished interest in the wine was a blessing.  Winemakers had spent those lost years quietly improving their grape quality, equipment, and techniques. Today, thanks to push toward quality and renewed interest in native Italian grape Verdicchio is to be taken more seriously.

Relatively unknown outside of Italy, Le Marche is a thriving wine production region boasting 12 DOC and 2 DOCG wines. The best known of these wines is the Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi, an outstanding white wine from the province of Ancona. – winesearcher.com

My wine the 2011 Sartarelli Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi “Tralivio” is produced by Sartarelli, a Verdicchio specialist based in the village of Poggio Dan Marcello.  

IMG_2421

2011 Sartarelli Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi “Tralivio”

My tasting notes follow:

Deep straw yellow color with green nuances in the glass with low-key stone fruit, apple, almond skin, lees, and crushed rock aromas. On the palate it’s medium-bodied, and dry, with vibrant acidity and a luscious mouth-feel. A wonderful combination of refreshment and substance.  It shows white peach, apple and lemon zest flavors balanced by a mineral tang with a lingering finish 13.5% alcohol. $15 retail

I was a bit apprehensive about pairing a white wine with a tomato sauce based dish, but the Verdicchio was a fine pairing with the Chicken in Potacchio!  I’d say it’s a classic “what grows together, goes together” match!

Join us live on Twitter today at 8am PST and throughout the weekend at #ItalianFWT and share your experiences of the Marche region in Italy.

Want more of Marche? Check out what my fellow #ItalianFWT bloggers have

Join us next month Saturday June 6th as we explore the Campania region in Italy.  If you would like to join our group email Vino Travels directly at vinotravels at hotmail dot com.  Ciao ciao for now!

_________________________________________________________________

Martin Redmond is a Financial Executive by day, and a certified wine geek with latent foodie tendencies the rest of the time. In addition to the wine lifestyle and food he enjoys family, fitness and traveling. He likes to get thoughts of wine off his mind by sharing experiences on his ENOFYLZ Wine blog, which features wine reviews, wine country travel, and wine and food pairings.

Follow me on Twitter @martindredmond for all things wine, and since I’m a wino, with latent foodie tendencies, you’ll also find food and wine pairings, and food related stuff! Become a fan and join ENOFYLZ Wine Blog on Facebook. Cheers! This article is original to ENOFYLZ Wine Blog.com. Copyright 2015 ENOFYLZ Wine BlogAll rights reserved.

Recap of 2015 Passport to Dry Creek Valley #DCVPassport

My wife, a friend of ours and I attended past weekend’s Passport to Dry Creek Valley. This was the 26th Annual Passport to Dry Creek Valley.  For the uninitiated, here’s a description of the event:

Passport to Dry Creek Valley® was introduced in 1990, by the Winegrowers of Dry Creek Valley®, as a time every year when the winegrowing community could come together to celebrate the generations of farmers, vintners and families that are the roots of the Dry Creek Valley wine region. Over the 26 years since, the event has become a beloved tradition among wine lovers who enjoy a world-class tasting experience with a festive twist, all within the idyllic Dry Creek Valley.

This is our fourth consecutive year, and sixth overall Passport to Dry Creek Valley. It’s become an annual tradition.  We like it because it’s fun event, and you can’t beat the value when consider the wine, food and entertainment that’s offered.

Over one weekend, Passport guests are welcomed into 45+ wineries throughout Dry Creek Valley, each offering a unique pairing of premium wine, gourmet food and entertainment. Take a vineyard tour for a grape-to-glass look at Dry Creek Valley wine. Sample exclusive vintages, rarely available to taste. Meet winemakers and grapegrowers – the generations of people behind the wine and magical ‘Dry Creek Valley spirit’. Savor exquisite food and wine pairings from acclaimed chefs.  Delight in discovering each winery’s unique Passport “theme,” a tradition of the event. The possibilities are as varied as the wineries themselves and promise a fun, unforgettable weekend. Enjoy!  The event runs from 11:00 a.m. – 4:30p each day.

It turned out to be another gorgeous weekend in Dry Creek Valley.

I thought what I call the “Dry Creek Streak“ was in jeopardy when it rained very early on Saturday morning (I’ve been told by many that it’s never rained during Passport ).  But sure enough, it cleared up by the time Passport started on Saturday and Sunday was even more beautiful!

Recap of 2015 Passport to Dry Creek Valley

As I sit here on the porch of a farm-house we rented for the weekend reflecting on what a fun weekend it was, my wife and our friend are “napping”.

IMG_2300-001

Since I’ve got some time, here’s a recap of  the memorable wines, food and wine pairings and entertainment we experienced.

Saturday

Since there are so many wineries, you need a plan (check out the participating wineries and/or the map of wineries).

We drove up Friday and finalized our plans while having dinner at the fabulous Chalkboard in Healdsburg, which has a thriving restaurant scene.

Our plan always includes a mix of favorites we visit every year (Seghesio, Rafanelli, Quivira, Kokomo, Papapietro Perry), plus wineries we’ve  either visited intermittently, or haven’t visited before.  The planning was made a bit easier this year, because there were a couple perennial favorites not participating this year for one reason or another – Unti (we dig the wines), and Stephen Walker ( the wines were good, but candidly we went for the last couple of years for the all you can eat oysters).

The Plan for Saturday was to visit:

We typically allow for an hour or so at each winery, so we plan to visit 5-6 wineries a day Then we see how it goes because as Helmuth Carl Bernard Graf von Moltke once said…

“No Battle Plan Survives Contact With the Enemy”

As it turned out things went better than planned on Saturday.  We visited the aforementioned wineries plus (thanks to “one stop shopping” at Family Wineries) the following wineries:

2015-04-282

My favorite wines were:

  • 2012 Seghesio Pagani Ranch Zinfandel
  • 2012 Seghesio Marian’s Reserve
  • 2013 Ridge Geyserville
  • 2012 Ridge Lytton Springs
  • 2012 Ridge Estate Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 2012 Mazzocco Warm Springs Ranch Zinfandel
  • 2014 Kokomo Grenache Rosé Pauline’s Vineyard
  • 2012 Papapietro Perry Pinot Noir Leras Family Vyd

My favorite food and wine pairings were:

  • Seghesio - 2013 Seghesio Barbera paired with Seghesio Panissi;Risotto alla Barbera w/Family Recipe Sausage, Cranberry Beans and Grano Padano Parmesan + 2011 Grenache 1942 Block paired with Linguine w/Wild Mushrooms, Hazelnut Cream Sauce, and Truffled Pecorino!
  • Mauritson – 2013 Mauritson Sauvignon Blanc paired with Mini Crab Cakes w/White Remoulade Sauce + 2013 Rockpile Zinfandel paired with Painted Hills Shredded Beef Sliders
  • Amphora - 2009 Bevill/Wolcott Vyd Petite Sirah paired with Chocolate Truffles with Gold Dust
  • Kokomo – 2012 Estate Malbec paired with Street tacos; Carnitas with mole sauce, roasted corn and chipotle aioli
  • Peterson – 2013 Geyserville Fire Dept 100 yr Anniversary Zinfandel paired with Firehouse Chili.

Other memorable moments:

There was wonderful live music at Seghesio, and Kokomo.  And Amphora offered a back to back tasting of their 2012 Aglianico and 2014 Aglianico (barrel sample). The 2012 was aged in oak, while the 2014 is being aged in an amphora (see photo above lower right corner).  Vintage variation aside, I found the difference between the two wine fascinating.  The 2014 showed more pronounced minerality and a texture I favored.  If you’re ever wondered about the difference between a wine aged in oak v concrete this was a wonderful opportunity to find out!

We didn’t visit any wineries we hadn’t been too before though.  We vowed to rectify that on Sunday!

 Sunday

The plan for Sunday included three wineries we hadn’t visited before (*):

2015-04-281

My favorite wines were:

  • 2012 A. Rafanelli Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 2013 Quivira Sauvignon Blanc Fig Tree
  • 2012 Quivira Zinfandel Reserve Dry Creek Valley
  • 2013 David Coffaro Lagrein
  • Cast Blanc de Noirs
  • 2013 Cast Estate Zinfandel
  • 2011 Sbragia Cabernet Sauvignon Andolsen Vineyard

My favorite food and wine pairings were:

  • A. Rafanelli -  2012 Cabernet Sauvginon paired with lamb pizza and beef brisket
  • Cast Estate – 2012 Estate Petite Sirah paired with pulled pork sliders
  • David Coffaro – 2014 Rose paired with Ahi Tuna Tartare
  • Kachina  2013 Charbono paired with Yucatan Style Beans
  • Quivira – 2011 Syrah paired with Nonie’s Meatball Brochette with Heirloom Tomato Puree adn Vella Dry Jack Cheese
  • Sbragia – 2012 La Promesa Zinfandel paired Farro & Spicy Salami Salad

Other memorable moments:

The live Jazz of Christian Foley at Cast was wonderful and seemed to be a perfect pairing with their wines and the view from their patio. I could have stayed longer.  The Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, and Dean Martin impersonators at Sbargia were very entertaining! were This is the second or third time we’ve finished Passport at Wilson.  DJ Fiznik Rick was rockin’ the house and it’s always a party with Wilson.  It’s become out favorite last stop for Passport.

Insider’s tip:  Unless you check in at A. Rafanelli, get there early. The line to get in is long. But the very hospitable staff comes out to pour wines while your waiting and the Italian Trio that entertains makes the wait bearable.  Once inside, the food totally makes it worth the wait!

We had a fantastic weekend at Passport to DCV!  It’s become an annual tradition for us!

The Best Wines to Pair with Tropical Food #SundaySupper

Today, the #SundaySupper family of food bloggers features recipes made with tropical food or originating from the tropics.

I adore tropical flavors. They are among my most favorite foods.  Whenever I think of tropical foods the first thing  that comes to mind is a Jamaican Jerk.  In fact, my first #SundaySupper blog that featured both food I prepared and wine pairing recommendations was Jerk Turkey Burgers With Mango Slaw!

Here are some general guidelines for pairing wines with tropical foods:

Whites

I favor aromatic, refreshing whites with a bit of sweetness to provide balance. Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Pinot Gris, Albarino, Torrontes, fruity Sauvignon Blancs (New Zealand is top of mind), Chenin Blanc, Viognier and white blends are all good choices.

Reds 

I’d be the first to tell you red wines are not top of mind when it comes to pairing with tropical flavors, but that doesn’t mean it’s not doable.  Looks for reds with prominent acidity moderate tannins and alcohol and buoyant fruit flavors.  Consider Pinot Noir for grilled fare, but Gamay, Grenache, and many Tempranillo are also fine choices.

Rosés

Aside, from sparkling wines, rosés are the most versatile, food friendly wines in my book. They offer a harmonious combination of bright acidity, texture and appealing aromatics. Both dry and off dry, rosés can work with a diverse range of tropical flavors.  If your tropical dish is more sweet that savory look for a  rosé with a hint of sweetness.  There are wonderful examples of rosé being produced all around the world.  But for the best value, I tend to favor rosés Provence, and Rioja.

Heat and Sweet

A couple of other things to keep in mind when pairing wines with tropical food 1) the spiciness (heat) of your dish, and 2) the sweetness of the dish – especially desserts.

Spicy foods like sweet wine.  The spicier your food, the sweeter your wine should be.

And for desserts, you want your wine to be sweeter than the dessert.

The Best Wines To Pair with Tropical Foods #SundaySupper

Image courtesy of fredericpatenaude.com

Check out  terrific tropical menu at the #SundaySupper table , along with my wine pairing recommendations (except for condiments and coolers).  My recommendations include wines from the U.S., Germany, France, and Italy

Pair these Tidbits, Pupus, Breakfast and Companions with a Rosé sparkling wine.  My “house’ (everyday) sparkling wine is the Deligeroy Crémant de Loire Rosé Brut. It’s a beautiful pale salmon color and packed with strawberry, cherry, peach and blood orange flavors, with a bit of sweetness that is complemented with a hint of herbaceousness.   

Tidbits and Pupus

Breakfast

Companions

Condiments and Sauces

Coolers

Pair these main dishes with Riesling.  Look for the 2013 Josef Leitz Dragonstone Riesling from Germany.  It aromatic and off-dry with white peach, pineapple, apple and citrus character and a refreshing acidity that will prepare your palate for the next delectable bite!

Pair these dishes with a white Rhone blend.  One of my favorite is the 2013 Tablas Creek Patelin de Tablas Blanc.  It’s a well-balanced, juicy blend of Grenache Blanc, Viognier, Roussanne and Marsanne with a tropical fruit, peach, lemon zest and mineral character.

Pair these main dishes with with Rosé.  A perennial favorite  of mine from Provence is the  2014 Commanderie de la Bargemone  Rosé.  It a blend of Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault and Cabernet Sauvignon that offers classic aromas of wild strawberries, red currant, and citrus. It’s dry, and fresh with ample strawberry, red currant and citrus flavors. 

Pair these main dishes with a Zinfandel.  Look for the 2012 Artezin Mendocino County Zinfandel.  It’s offers appealing red fruit, spice and vanilla aromas with juicy black cherry, plum, raspberry, baking spice, and a bit of pepper flavors with a supple texture.  Damned delicious!

Pair these desserts with a Cadillac, named for a little known village just south of Bordeaux that produces wonderful sweet botrytized white wines. It’s never reached the lofty status of Sauternes, just across the river.  The wines are typically made from Semillion, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle grapes. Look for the 2009 Chateau Suau, Cadillac.  It a blend of 40% Sauvignon – 60% Semillon with a fruity, complex, and sweet peach and honey character with good acidity. 

Elevate these desserts by pairing with a sparkling red wine - Brachetto d’Acqui, from Piedmont region of Italy. It is produced from the Brachetto grape.  Look for Banfi Rosa Regale. It has delicate aromas of  rose petals, strawberry, and raspberries with  luscious raspberry, strawberry and a kiss of cranberry flavors. It’s off-dry meaning it exhibits ample sweetness when pairing with fruit based desserts,  and dark chocolate. 

Cheers!

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.