Wine Pairings for Home for the Holidays #SundaySupper

This week’s #SundaySupper theme “Home for the Holidays”, and is all about holiday traditions. Americans are such a diverse people.  As such, we have diverse holiday traditions that reflect our multitude of heritages. I prefer to focus on the common threads that run through the our diverse national fabric.  Among those common threads are family and tradition, and that’s  #SundaySupper movement is all about.

Our family tradition is to gather on Christmas Eve for our holiday meal and opening gifts (it used to be one gift when I was a kid, and when my kids were small – since we all adults now, and getting together can be like herding cats, we just open all the gifts on Christmas Eve). We’ve enjoyed Prime Rib, the last couple of years, but don’t really have a long-standing standard holiday meal. I guess, it’s more about getting together than what we eat.

Wine Lights Candles

Image courtesy of winecellarage.com

For this week’s “Home for the Holidays” theme, as best as I can, my wine pairing recommendations will reflect our diversity.  Aside from wanting to make my wine pairing recommendations congruent with this week’s theme, my reason for doing so also reflects some pragmatic food and wine pairing advice…that is pair the foods of a place with the wines of that place (Spanish wines with Spanish food, German wine with German food, etc).The flavors of food and wines that have “grown up” together over centuries (at least primarily in the case of the European “Old World” countries) are almost always a natural match. So where I could readily discern a heritage of the dish, my wine pairing recommendation(s) will be for a wine from that country. Of course, there are exceptions, but keeping this guideline in mind is a great place to start.

Here is this week’s stellar line-up of dishes.  My wine pairing recommendations are italicized.

Breakfast

Pair these breakfast dishes (except the coffee cake) with sparkling wine. Nothing like adding some sparkle to your morning to start the day!.  Look for Scharffenberger Brut Excellence, a California sparkling wine from Mendocino County.  It’s a blend of Chardonnay, and Pinot Noir with a lovely red fruit, apple, citrus and a touch of honey character.  

Pair the coffee cake with the Broadbent 10 year Malmsey Madeira. One of the things I appreciate about Madeira is that it’s relatively indestructible.  Once opened, it will keep for at least 6 months.  It’s a great dessert wine to keep on hand because it has a backbone of natural acidity.  It a great match for fruitcake, or rich desserts made with cream or chocolate. Or it can be the dessert in and of itself (If you have a sweet tooth, Madeira can satisfy it, and it has few calories too most other dessert choices!;-) 

Appetizers & Snacks

Pair these dishes with the Scharffenberger Brut Excellence

Main Dishes and Sides

Pair this dishes with a white Rhone blend. What’s great about blends is that the combination of grape varietals creates vinous synergy – a wine that is greater than the sum of its parts. Look for the 2011 Tablas Creek Patelin de Tablas Blanc. It’s a blend of Grenache Blanc, Viognier, Marsanne, and Roussanne. It’s a crisp and aromatic wine with honeysuckle and stone fruit aromas that follow onto the palate. It also has very good acidity and an appealing minerality that make it versatile food partner.

Pair the following dishes with the 2011 Burgáns Albariño Rias Baixas a crisp, fresh food-friendly white wine from Spain with a crisp apple, apricot and peach character. 

Pair these dishes with Gruner Vetliner (Groo-ner Velt-Leen-er), the primary white grape variety of Austria.  It is typically medium-bodied, high-acid mineral driven wine that is very food friendly.  Look for the 2011 Laurenz V. Singing Gruner Veltliner. 

Pair these dishes with Sangiovese (that is if you prefer wine over the delightful Martinis;-). I recommend the 2010 La Mozza I Perazzi Morellino di Scansano. It’s a “Super-Tuscan blend of 85% Sangiovese, 5% Syrah, 5% Alicante, 2% Colorino and 3% Ciliegiolo.  It shows a wonderful mixed berry, and spice character with a bit of smoky tobacco, and licorice aromas. 

Pair this dish with the Scharffenberger Brut Excellence sparkling wine:

Pair these dishes with Torrontes, a white Argentine wine grape variety that produces delightful, spicy, perfumed wines.  Look for the 2011 Bodega Colome Torrontes. It’s off-dry with an aromatic fresh citrus, kiwi, and white flower character. 

Pair these dishes with a Riesling.  One of my favorites is the 2011 Josef Leitz Rüdesheimer Drachenstein “Dragonstone” Riesling. It’s an off-dry Riesling with an apple, pear, citrus, and mineral character with great acidity. 

Pair this dish with the 2009 Boas Vinhas Tinto Dao, a red wine from Portugal that is a blend of the indigenous Portuguese grapes Touriga Nacional, Alfrocheiro and Tinta Roriz with a  plum, dried berry, blackberry and spice character that is layered with supple tannins and good acidity.

Pair this dish with a Moscato d’Asti Moscato d’Asti from Italy.  Look for the 2011 Saracco Moscato d’Asti. It shows a sweet, fragrant, delicate, floral, tropical fruit, and a hint of honey character.  It’s “frizzante”, which means it’s not as effervescent as most sparkling wines. It’s also a wonderful example of why I love sparkling wines, they can work with all the courses of a meal from appetizers through dessert. 

Desserts

Pair these desserts with a Sauternes,  a sweet wine from the Sauternais region of the Graves section of Bordeaux. They are made from  SémillonSauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle grapes affected by noble rot.  Look for the 2005 Guiraud Sauternes.  It has a full-bodied, honeyed, lemon tart, baked apple, baking spice, and  vanilla cream character

Pair these desserts with an Oloroso Sherry, a denser richer style of Sherry.  Look for the Lustau East Indian Solera. It’s a provocative sweet creamy Sherry with a toffee, fig, caramel, raisin, and baking spice  (cinnamon and clove) character. 

Pair these Italian desserts with the 2011 Saracco Moscato d’Asti.

Pair this dish with a late harvest Riesling.  Look for the  2011 Joh. Jos. Prum Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese. It’s a has an elegant, floral, spicy, exotic, and tropical fruit character. 

Pair this dish with an a German Red wine made from the Spatburgunder (Pinot Noir) grape variety. Look for the 2009 Friedrich Becker Estate Pinot Noir.  It’s a spicy treat with a strawberry, cherry, and earthy character that will stand up to having the Pfeffernusse dipped in it, or used as a based for gluhwein, a spiced red wine drink!

Drinks

What does it mean for you to be Home for the Holidays?  Please join on us on Twitter throughout the day during #SundaySupper on December 23rd.  In the evening we will meet at 7pm EST for our #SundaySupper to talk about our Holiday Traditions.  We are so excited to have you join us.  All you have to do is follow the #SundaySupper hashtag or you can follow us through TweetChat.

Please feel free to share with us and our followers your favorite Holiday recipe on our #SundaySupper Pinterest Board.  We are excited to have you!

Oyster and Brie Soup and Wine Pairings for Celebrity Chef #SundaySupper

This week’s Favorite Celebrity Chef #SundaySupper theme was a blast from the past for me.  While I count Alton Brown, Paula Deen, Tyler Florence and Emeril Lagasse, among my favorite celebrity chefs, it wasn’t one of their dishes that was top of mind for me.

You know how there are dishes you will always remember because they just blow you mind for one reason or another?  Well, I’ll never forget the first time I had Blackened Redfish.  That was probably 30 years ago, yet I can still recall it like it was yesterday. Those layers of sassy Cajun spice and flavors took my taste buds to a place they’d never been before!

The man who put Blackened Redfish on our culinary maps was Chef Paul Prudhomme. Chef Paul’s claim to fame is the legendary K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen in the French Quarter of New Orleans, which he and his wife Kay opened in 1979.  Prior to opening K-Paul’s Prudhomme was the executive chef at the another iconic New Orleans restaurant, the Commander’s Palace, where he was succeeded by Emeril Lagasse. According to Wikipedia…

Prudhomme has been credited with popularising cajun cuisine and in particular blackened redfish during the 1980s, and has been credited with introducing the turducken.

His cookbook Paul Prudhomme’s Louisiana Kitchen, published in 1984, was awarded the Culinary Classic Book Award in 2012 by the International Association of Culinary Professionals.  That’s were I got the recipe for his Oyster and Brie soup.  It’s a recipe I’ve had my eye on for years and finally decided to make for this week’s Favorite Celebrity #SundaySupper theme.

The soup is creamy but not too heavy ( I think of it as a Cajun Oyster and Brie bisque) with a slightly peppery kick that reminds me of an Etouffe. It was a fabulous pairing with the sparkling wine (Crémant) I used in the soup.

Oyster and Brie Soup and Wine Pairings for Celebrity Chef #SundaySupper
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Cajun
Serves: 8
 
Ingredients
  • 3 dozen small to medium oysters in their liquor, about 18 ounces
  • 4 cups cold water
  • ½ pound (2 stick) unsalted butter
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped onions
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped celery
  • ½ tsp. white pepper
  • ½ tsp. ground red pepper
  • 1 lb fresh brie cheese, cut in small wedges, with rind on
  • 2 c. heavy cream
  • ½ champagne, optional
Instructions
  1. Combine oysters and water; stir and refrigerate at least 1 hours. Strain and reserved the oysters and oyster water; refrigerate until ready to use.
  2. In a large skillet melt the butter over low heat. Add the flour and beat with a metal whisk until smooth. Add the onions and celery; sauté about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in peppers and sauté about 2 minutes more. Set aside.
  3. In a 4-qt saucepan, bring oyster water to a boil. Stir in the sautéed vegetable mixture until well mixed. Turn up heat to high. Add cheese; coo until cheese starts to melt, about 2 minutes, stirring constantly. (Be careful not to let the cheese scorch.)
  4. Lower heat to simmer and contue cooking for about 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, strain soup and return to pot. Turn the heat to high and cook about 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in cream; cook until close to a boil about 2 minutes. Stir in champagne, if desired.
  5. Turn off heat and add oysters. Let pan sit for about 3 minutes to plump oysters. Serve immediately.
Notes
The recipe calls for Champagne, but opted for a sparkling wine from the Burgundy region of France instead. While Champagne sill has that "je ne sais quoi" (something special), a Crémant (a sparkling wines made outside of the Champagne region using the same production method are known)

 

Speaking of wine pairings, I’m also offering wine pairings for this week’s fabulous Favorite Celebrity Chef #SundaySupper menu.  My recommended wine pairing are italicized.  Click on the name of the wine to find out where to purchase.

Pair these Starters, Snacks and Sides with NV Blason de Bourgogne Crémant de Bourgogne Brut Réserve from Trader Joe’s.  It’s a tasty blend of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Gamay and Aligoté with a toasty pear, fuji apple, citrus and hint of baking spice character. This is our new everyday sparkling wine! At $10/bottle it’s a very good value!

Pair these main dishes with the 2010 Bodega Colomé Amalaya - a silky smooth blend of Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon,Syrah and Tannat from Argentina with a mixed black and red berry, oaky spice and sweet tobacco character.

Pair the following main dishes with a crisp refreshing white blend, in this case the 2010 d’Arenberg Stump Jump White - a blend of 28% Riesling, 27% Sauvignon Blanc, 25% Marsanne and 20% Roussanne from McLaren Vale, Australia.  It’s very food friendly with juicy citrus and tropical fruit aromas balanced nicely with good acidity.

Pair the following dishes with the 2011 Burgáns Albariño Rias Baixas a crisp, fresh food-friendly white wine from Spain with a crisp apple, apricot and peach character. 

Pair these dishes with a Chenin Blanc from the Loire Valley in France. I recommend the 2011 Pascal Janvier Jasnières.  It shows a core of tangy apple, citrus fruit complemented by a mineral undertone. 

Pair these desserts with a Sauternes,  a sweet wine from the Sauternais region of the Graves section of Bordeaux. They are made from  SémillonSauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle grapes affected by noble rot.  Look for the 2005 Guiraud Sauternes.  It has a full-bodied, honeyed, lemon tart, baked apple, baking spice, and  vanilla cream character

Pair with these desserts with the Yalumba Muscat Museum Reserve, a dessert wine from Australia with rose petal, ginger and orange peel aromas, and rich raisined fruit, and spice flavors.
Please join on us via Twitter for #SundaySupper on December 2, 2012, throughout the day. In the evening, we will meet at 7 PM EST for our weekly #SundaySupper live chatAll you have to do is follow the #SundaySupper hashtag or you can follow us through TweetChat.

What Are The Best Types of Wines For Picnics?

Now that Memorial Day weekend upon us.  And it’s widely considered to be the unofficial beginning of summer.  And summer is primetime for picnics….well you get the picture.  Here’s a list of the types of wines that will be a good match for picnic fare, along with some recommendations to get you started!

12 Most Picnic Friendly Wines

After a couple of weeks of much-needed rain, Spring is finally getting “Spring—ish” here in Northern California. For the first time this year, temperatures in the 80s are being forecast and my thoughts have turned to warm temperatures and al fresco dining, especially picnics.

Picnic wines are different than BBQ wines. BBQ is all about bold and spicy flavors, whereas picnic foods compose a broader range of lighter foods like salads of all kinds, cold fried chicken, charcuterie, cheeses, ripe fruits etc., mostly served cold.

Great picnic wines are 1) Light and refreshing, 2) A good match for a variety of foods, and 3) Inexpensive ($20 or less).

Image courtesy of thriftysolutionsforanurbangal.blogspot.com

1. Rosé

A dry Rosé would be my first choice. Rosé combines the best of white and red wines, while maintaining their own unique charm. They possess the crisp acidity, delicacy and freshness of white wines, and the body, and flavors of red wines. Look for Bodegas Muga Rosado.

2. Cava

Cava is perfect for picnics. It’s produced using the traditional style Champagne method, which can lend a bit of complexity to it. And bubbly will add that extra celebratory feel to your picnic. Here’s another advantage of sparkling wines — Forget the corkscrew? — No problem with sparklers!! I recommend Segura Viudas Gran Reserva Cava.

3. Rose Sparkling Wine

For some vinous synergy, go with a Sparkling Rose wine. They go with virtually anything you serve for your picnic. I recommend Mumm Napa Brut Rose.

4. Vinho Verde

Vinho Verde is a wine from Portugal. Vinho Verde isn’t a grape variety. While it literally means ‘green wine”, it translates into “young wine” – as in it’s meant to be consumed within a year of bottling. It’s made in white, red, and rose styles. Vinho Verde has a hint of effervescence which is further enhances its refreshing qualities. Go with either a white or rose Vinho Verde. Look for Quinta de Aveleda.

5. Torrontés

Wine made from this grape (Argentina’s only truly indigenous grape) produces a juicy fragrant wine with citrus pineapple and spice flavors. This would be a great match for a seafood, or spicy Asian salad. I recommend the Bodegas Colome Torrontés Estate.

6. Riesling

It’s probably the most food-friendly white wine. Choose either a dry or off-dry (slightly sweet) style. Look for Chateau Ste. Michelle Columbia Valley Riesling.

7. Chardonnay

Look for a lighter style, either an un-oaked or a lightly-oaked, chardonnay because it will be a better match for a broader range of foods than the heavily oaked style. I recommend Joseph Drouhin Macon Villages.

8. Sauvignon Blanc

This is a classic picnic wine because it’s fresh and crisp, with a citrusy flavor profile and lively acidity. It’s a great match for goat cheese! Look for Casa Lapostolle Sauvignon Blanc from Chile.

9. Moscato

If your taste in wine leans toward the sweeter side, try Moscato. It’s like summertime in a glass with its fruity orange blossom, tropical, citrus, or melon aromas and a touch of effervescence. If you’ve got something spicy in your picnic basket, the sweetness will tame the heat. The best are from Italy. I recommend Martini and Rossi Moscato d’Asti.

10. Albariño

Albariño is a refreshing light, juicy and aromatic Spanish wine. I like it because, along with some citrus, it brings melon or peach to the party. Look for Burgans Albariño Rias Baixas.

11. Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir, a.k.a. the “Chef’s wine” is so named because it goes with such a wide range of foods. It’s also a red wine that takes a bit of a chill well (put it in an ice/water bath in your cooler for 10-15 minutes) if the alcohol level is not too high (preferably below 14%). It’d be great with anything with mushrooms. Look for 2008 Gloria Ferrer Pinot Noir.

12. Sangria

For a bit of home-made flavor, make your own sangria. It’s easy to make and can be made with either red, or white wine. Sangria is a great way to capitalize on the bounty of fresh fruits coming into season — and make sangria that’s all your own! Click here for some recipes.

Happy picnicking! What are your favorite picnic wines?

This article was previously featured on 12 Most and is republished, by the author Martin Redmond

In a Wine Rut? Try these wines!

Admit it. You know there is a whole wide world of wine out there, but you still cling to a handful of favorites. Right?! I know it’s comfy, but you can do better! It’s time get out of your Cab, Chardonnay, Pinot wine rut, and discover some new favorites! With that spirit of adventure in mind, here’s a list of rut-busting wines to try. I’ll profile the grape from which the wine is made, and offer a recommendation of a fine example of each. There’s something for everyone with six white wine, and six red wines!

Cabernet Sauvignon grape cluster, shown by DNA...

Cabernet Sauvignon grape cluster, shown by DNA studies to be a cross of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon blanc. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

White Wines

1. Marsanne

This is probably the finest grape variety you’ve never heard of. It makes a full-bodied, sometimes rustic wine with amazing complexity, and honey, peach, and sweet spice flavors. If you like Chardonnay, give this wine a try. It’s fabulous with cracked crab and other shellfish. Look for JC Cellars Stagecoach Vineyard Marsanne.

2. Viognier

I consider this grape to be a primary rival to Chardonnay. It produces a juicy, aromatic wine with exotic stone fruit , and spice flavors. If you like Gewürztraminer, give Viognier a try. I’ve enjoyed this wine with various Asian cuisines. Look for Yalumba Viognier Eden Valley.

3. Albariño

This grape, which is native to Spain, produces a juicy fragrant wine that reminds me of a cross between Viognier, and Sauvignon Blanc. It has that Viognier’s peachy flavors, along with fresh citrus flavors found in Sauvignon Blanc. It’s great alternative to Sauvignon Blanc. Pair with seafood, Asian fare, or tapas! I like the Martin Codax Albariño Rias Baixas Burgens.

4. Assyrtiko

This grape is native to Greece, where it is the specialty of the volcanic island of Santorini. Its lively acidity makes it a food friendly wine with citrus, pineapple, and mineral flavors. It would make a great alternative to dry French or Italian wine such as Pinot Grigio. It’s a natural match for a Feta Salad. Look for Domaine Sigalas Assyrtiko.

5. Torrontés

This grape, which is Argentina’s only truly indigenous grape, produces a juicy fragrant wine with citrus pineapple and spice flavors. It is Argentina’s signature white variety. It’s a pretty food friendly wine that would be a great wine to bring along on a summer picnic. It pairs wonderfully with seafood, or try it with a pasta primavera or spicy Asian noodle, or curry dishes. Look for the Bodegas Colome Torrontés Estate.

6. Vermentino

This grape makes an increasingly popular juicy aromatic wine with citrus, stone fruit, and tropical fruit flavors. If you enjoy Sauvignon Blanc, and/or Pinot Grigio this one may change your mind! It pairs wonderfully with pesto, a specialty in Liguria, Italy. It would also be a good match with seafood, or Tuscan cuisine.  I recommend the Tablas Creek Vermentino.

Red Wines

7. Pinotage

This grape, which is the signature red variety of South Africa, was created in 1925 at Stellenbosch University. It a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, two French grapes, that thrive in South Africa. It shows the soft fruitiness of Pinot Noir, and the rustic characteristics of Cinsault. It produces a fruity, lively wine with soft tannins, and black fruit, spicy and many tasters report, banana flavors. While it’s home is South Africa it is also making inroads in New Zealand, Canada, Israel, Zimbabwe, California, North Carolina, and Virginia. This would make a nice change of pace if you enjoy Pinot Noir. Pair with game, ratatouille or hearty soups. Look for the Tukulu Pinotage.

8. Petite Sirah

This grape, which is also known as Durif, is considered an American Heritage grape. It produces a rich dense wine with blackberry flavors. If you like Zinfandel, give this wine a try. It’s a very good food wine. I’ve enjoyed with a wide variety of foods, but it great with steak, roasts, and grilled meats. Look for Ridge Petite Sirah Lytton Estate.

9. Mourvèdre (More-VEHD-ruh)

This grape originated in Spain where it is referred to as Mataro,or Monastrell. It makes rich dense red wines that are powerful, and tannic with earthy, savory black fruit and sweet spice flavors. It’s a good match for stews, roasts, and grilled meats. Look for the Quivira Mourvèdre.

10. Tannat

This is a grape, which is native to France, but now a specialty of Uruguay that produces makes robust; yet elegant wines with high levels of tannins, great aging potential, and dark berry, plum, and spice flavors. If you’re a fan of Cabernet Sauvignon, give Tannat a try. Owing to its high acidity it’s a bit more versatile than Cab. It would pair nicely with grilled meats. Look for the newly released Tablas Creek Tannat.

11. Teroldego (tah-RAWL-de-go)

This grape is native to Italy, but is also grown in California where does well in the Sierra Foothills region. It produces a ripe smooth wine that is dark and savory with dark berry, plum, and spice flavors. Its high acidity makes it food friendly. Try this with roast duck, Indian Cuisine, or your favorite red wine cheese. Look for the Urban Legend Teroldego.

12. Aglianico

This grape, which is native to Italy makes the great full-bodied, intense, tannic wine with berry, cherries, plums and spice flavors. Its high acidity makes it food friendly. Pair with hearty meats, tomato-based pasta dishes like lasagna, or lamb. Look for the Seghesio Family Aglianico.

With over 10,000 grape varieties, this list is by no means complete. There are a host of other possibilities from around the world from countries, like Hungary, Austria, and Croatia to name a few! Not sure where to start? Cozy up to your local wine shop clerk, ask your wino friends (yours truly included), or do a little research online at sites like Snooth.com, or Wine Access.com. Your effort will not be in vain. You’ll be rewarded with new, and exciting wine that’ll get you out of your wine rut!

This article was previously featured on 12 Most and is republished, by the author. 

Thanksgiving, Wine and You!

Thanksgiving Dinner

We’ve decided to deep-fry our turkey for Thanksgiving this year. Initially I wondered if deep frying the turkey vs. roasting it one way or another would influence by decision about what wines to pair with the turkey.  My initial conclusion: only slightly because the deep-fried turkey tends to be more flavorful than a roast turkey in my experience. But then I realized I was over-thinking it.  There’s a tendency to do that, I think, with holiday meals because a) there are so many flavors involved, and b) wanting to please everyone with wine(s) selected.  Especially Thanksgiving, which can be perceived to be especially challenging, with the combination of sweet, savory, and spicy flavors.

Figuring out which wine(s) to serve with your Thanksgiving meal doesn’t have to be daunting, especially if you work with versatile wines. Here are my thoughts on the matter…

The first thought that comes to mind is to select a red and a white to keep those who are going to drink wine happy.  But indulge me for a moment. If I had to pick one wine to go with Thanksgiving dinner, it wouldn’t be a white or a red; it would be a dry rosé, and probably a dry sparking rosé at that. Dry rosés are very versatile, and can handle the diversity of flavor and “weight” profiles that are part and parcel of Thanksgiving fare. You add the effervescence of a sparkler to the mix and you’ve got the Swiss army knife of wines (See my blog about Rosés – “Everything is coming up Rosés for me” below)!

Now back to my original thought of having a mix of red and white wines. I recommend the following:

1.       Start with a sparkling wine. It’s a great aperitif to sip while waiting for the turkey to finish cooking, and it goes well with starters like appetizers, soup, and salad.  Beside it adds a celebratory note to Thanksgiving.

2.      For white wine, the safe bet is a dry, or off-dry Riesling. Rieslings play well with spicy, sweet or sweet dishes. It’s an aromatic grape that typically produces wines with almost perfumed aromas of flowers, and stone fruits (apples, pears, peaches, and apricot), and it’s high in acidity, which makes it a versatile pairing partner for your Thanksgiving meal.   Other good choices are Gewurztraminer, and Pinot Gris. Looking to expand you, and your guests wine palates? Try an Albarino, or Viognier.  While they lack the name recognition of Chardonnay, either will offer more versatile pairing power for your Thanksgiving meal than many Chardonnays.

3.      For red wine, the safe bet is a Pinot Noir, a traditional favorite red wine for Thanksgiving. Pinot Noir’s fruitiness, subtle earthy undertones, and acidity tend to show well with the traditional flavors of turkey and stuffing. Not a fan of Pinot Noir?, try a Beaujolais Nouveau a light fruity red wine made from the Gamay grape will pair well with turkey and all the fixings. Beaujolais Nouveau is released from France on the third Thursday of November, just in time to highlight your Thanksgiving feast!  Or even better try a Cru Beaujolais which is step up in quality.

4.      And remember about a wine to pair with dessert.  Madeira would work well with pumpkin/sweet potato pie, or pecan pie, while a port, would work with chocolate desserts.  Looking to shake it up a bit on the dessert wine front?  Try an ice wine, or late harvest Riesling, especially with cheesecake. Just remember the dessert wine should be sweeter than the dessert.

Of course, at the end of the day choosing a Thanksgiving wine is truly about what pleases you and yours. There are no hard and fast turkey pairing rules, but there are lots of options to experiment with.

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